Bridging Loans Explained

Bridging loans have become popular among borrowers for all the right reasons. With everyone talking about bridging loans, including the mainstream media, the chances are that you have already heard of these loans before.

This is especially true if you are trying to move houses. However, several people do not know what a bridging loan is and how it works.

Taking a bridging loan could be the best thing to do if you have found a dream house you want to acquire before someone else buys it, and you are yet to find a buyer for your existing home, which still has a mortgage.

A bridging loan will give you the funds you need to buy the second house as you wait to sell the current one. Even so, there is so much more to bridging loans than you might imagine.

In this guide, we will discuss everything about bridging loans from the basics, pros, and cons. keep reading to discover everything you need to know about bridging loans.

So what exactly is a Bridging Loan?

So what exactly is a Bridging Loan?

Simply put, a bridging loan is a short-term loan taken on top of the current home loan. As the name suggests, a bridging loan is usually taken when you need to buy a new house immediately before selling your existing home. When you take this loan, you will be paying interest on two loans.

To put things into perspective, bridging loans are a form of interest-only loans.

The value of your existing property will determine the value of the loan. It is also vital to note that these loans have limited terms and contain special concerns.

The structure of bridging loans differs from one private money lender to another. Some private lending providers will require you to continue serving your loan until you settle in your new property. The private finance providers will the interest of your two loans together during the loan duration.

Once you find a buyer for your second property, the mortgage will be discharged. You will then start paying the principal and interest of your current loan. On the other hand, other private lending providers will ask you to service both loans after taking a new one.

After the sale of your home, the initial mortgage will be discharged, while the bridging loan might be converted into the home of your choice for your new property.

When taking a bridging loan, it would help to think about compounding interest because you will be charged for both loans. Always keep in mind that you will end up paying more than you should if you fail to find a buyer for your house quickly. Bridging loan interests are calculated daily and charged monthly.

Another key element you should have in mind is the duration of the bridging loan. These loans usually last around six months to 12 months, depending on the private finance providers and your preferences. Your loan length will be six months if you buy an existing home and 12 months for a new one.

What are the Pros and Cons of a Bridging Loan?

Now that you are aware of what a bridging loan is and how it functions, it is time to look at the pros and cons. Understanding the benefits of these loans and the challenges you are likely to encounter when you take a bridge loan will help you make the right decisions. Here are the pros and cons of a bridging loan:

The Benefits of a Bridging Loan:

Bridging loans have so much to offer. It is crucial to understand what you should expect with this type of loan to get the best options. Here are the pros of bridging loans:

 More Convenience:

Do you want to buy your dream home quickly? A bridging loan will allow you to do just that even if you have not sold your existing house just yet.

Flexible Repayments:

Depending on your bridging loan structure, you will only have to service your existing home loan finance when you take a bridging loan.

Avoid Further Expenses:

You will not have to rent when you take a bridging loan. It will allow you to move even if you do not have a buyer for your house.

Considerations of a Bridging Loan:

Like is the case with any other type of loan, bridging loans also have their fair share of cons. For instance, you will be forced to pay more if you fail to sell your house as soon as possible.

Choosing the Best Bridging Loans for Your Needs:

Bridging loans are categorized as open bridging loans and closed bridging loans. Closed bridging loans have a pre-determined settlement date while open bridging loans do not have an agreed settlement date.

When looking for a bridging loan, it will help to consider the duration, interest rates, and loan structure. It would also help to compare alternative loans before making the final decision.

Above all, it is essential to find the right private lending company. Fortunately, you can use an easy-to-use online platform such as ADS.finance to find the best private finance option near you.

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Ariana Smith

I enjoy writing and I write quality guest posts on topics of my interest and passion. I have been doing this since my college days. My special interests are in health, fitness, food and following the latest trends in these areas. I am an editor at Content Rally.

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