5 Of the Highest Paid Remote Jobs

Published on: 11 August 2018 Last Updated on: 01 December 2023
Highest Paid Remote Jobs

Remote jobs are the hottest trend in the workforce. At present, around half of the total working Americans have done remote work in the past year. And this trend will continue to grow in the years to come. The convenience it brings, as well as the benefits of using up lesser overhead operational costs, can make it beneficial for many businesses.

If you are an employee looking for remote job opportunities, then you may be discouraged if you see that some positions do not offer a full-time salary. However, this isn’t true. There are a lot of options available that could potentially replace or even exceed the salary you once had. In this article, we will be looking into the top highest-paid remote jobs in the market.

5 Of the Highest Paid Remote Jobs

1. Cyber Consultants :

In case you’re wondering, consultants have one of the highest salaries in the remote marketplace. This is because a lot of businesses are looking for actionable advice about certain areas for growth. For example, startups find marketing consultants who can devise solutions on how to increase their brand awareness as well as promote their products. Financial consultants deal with individuals who want to stay on top of their investments. Consultant salary in 2018 is expected to increase as the demand rises, with some earning up to $100,000 a year, depending on the expertise.

2. Customer Success Support Engineer :

When it comes to marketing, it is important to ensure customer success. Top e-commerce websites like Amazon and eBay hire customer success support engineers to create systems that make sure that the onboarding process is easy. These highly paid engineers make sure that the system also generates results, such as subscriptions, payments, and all other processes needed to make revenue for the companies. Since businesses cannot physically persuade clients, they have to make sure that the user experience will lead to higher rates of customer success.

3. UI-UX Website Designer :

Many of the highly paid professionals deal with the technical aspects of building a website. User interface and user experience website designers are also some of the top earners who can do their work remotely. They are experienced in coding languages such as HTML 5, Javascript, as well as CSS. These coding languages help make the best websites with the optimal loading speed and easy-to-navigate interface. They also partner with the customer success team to provide the best results. To get this kind of job, you must know coding languages and have some form of portfolio or experience to begin with.

4. District Sales Manager :

Sales aren’t just about meeting people upfront. In fact, you can easily work in a remote setting as long as you have prior experience leading a team. District sales managers are some of the top-paid workers in the sales management team. They are responsible for training sales associates. What’s great about this job is that district sales managers can train their employees remotely, where they can set up virtual courses, give assignments, or provide online communication that would suffice for actual training.

5. Senior Medical Writer :

The healthcare industry is gradually streamlining from traditional means to digital information transfer. This is why senior medical writers are highly in-demand as they would need to conduct research, transcribe information, and present medical reports to esteemed healthcare companies and hospitals. The information that the medical writer creates is highly technical, and a lot of professionals in this field require experience in medicine or the healthcare industry.

These examples prove that working remotely doesn’t mean slaving off for minimum wage. Through training and years of experience, many employees can benefit from work-at-home opportunities with a hefty paycheck.

Author Bio: Adrian Rubin is a full-time graphic designer and freelance writer.

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I enjoy writing and I write quality guest posts on topics of my interest and passion. I have been doing this since my college days. My special interests are in health, fitness, food and following the latest trends in these areas. I am an editor at Content Rally.

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However, most practicing respiratory therapists pursue this degree further.   These courses are meant to get students ready for certification in respiratory therapy from the National Board for Respiratory Care. The following qualifications are provided by the NBRC and are thought to be prerequisites for licensure.   Certified Respiratory Therapist (CRT)   Registered Respiratory Therapist (RRT)  A license to practice respiratory therapy is a prerequisite for becoming a certified respiratory therapist (CRT) in every state. Nonetheless, there is a growing national movement to mandate that all respiratory therapists with licenses possess the RRT certification. 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Additionally, according to the BLS, the typical compensation for respiratory therapists is $60,280.   The following are some recent job titles for respiratory therapy that can be found on the American Association for Respiratory Care Job Board:   Respiratory Therapist   Health and Medical Services Manager  Respiratory Therapy Technician   Respiratory Function Technologist   Pulmonary Rehabilitation Manager   Respiratory Services Site Manager   Respiratory Care Practitioner   Life Flight Neonatal/Pediatric Respiratory Therapist   Respiratory Therapy Supervisor   Assistant Professor – Respiratory Care   Director of Clinical Education, Respiratory Therapy   A bachelor's or master's degree is required for some of these positions. In fact, by 2020, 80% of RTs should either have earned or be pursuing a bachelor's degree, according to AARC, which also notes that graduate degrees are necessary for upper-level management and teaching positions. “How to become a respiratory therapist” is a question more complicated to answer than ask.  Benefits of an Online Degree in Respiratory Therapy For those employed as respiratory therapists and those who want to work in this industry, online degree programs can be a great choice. For instance, the online Bachelor of Science in Respiratory Therapy program offered by the University of Cincinnati equips qualified Registered and Certified Respiratory Therapists (RRTs) and CRTs for advanced clinical practice, graduate school, and management opportunities.   The program is intended to help you advance your clinical skills and gain a deeper understanding of advanced healthcare operations, logistics, technology, leadership, ethics, and project management. It has a robust curriculum that focuses on advancing respiratory therapy practice and research.   How To Become a Respiratory Therapist? To become a respiratory therapist, one must fulfill several requirements as a qualified medical practitioner. Read below for information on the training, experience, certification, as well as license needed to work as a respiratory therapist.   Obtain a Degree in Respiratory Therapy A minimum associate degree in respiratory therapy is required to work as a respiratory therapist. Human anatomy, physiology, and respiratory care procedures and tests are all covered in a typical respiratory therapy education program. Students studying respiratory therapy typically complete clinical hours in addition to their coursework, which gives them practical experience working with patients.   For full-time students, an associate degree typically takes two years to complete. Certain respiratory therapy programs provide expedited pathways that enable students to complete their degrees faster. Naturally, students who study part-time take longer to complete their degrees.   Nonetheless, a bachelor's degree in respiratory therapy can make you stand out from the competition because some employers might favor hiring respiratory therapists with a higher level of education. For full-time students, most bachelor's programs require four years.   Select a program that has been accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (CoARC), regardless of the degree level you intend to pursue. CoARC's program directory allows you to determine if the program you are considering is accredited.   Finish Internship An internship offers more practical experience in respiratory therapy. Even though clinical experiences are completed as part of the degree program. Internships help you build your professional network as well as find mentors. They can also help you land a job once you graduate.   Acquire Certification The National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC) offers professional certification applications that you can submit after receiving your degree in respiratory therapy. The Certified Respiratory Therapist (CRT) and Registered Respiratory Therapist (RRT) credentials are the two most widely held certifications in the field. Your concentration may determine whether you need to pursue a more specialized certification. Here is more information about the certification procedure.   Request a License Alaska is not among the 49 states where practicing respiratory therapy requires a license. The CRT or RRT are the two primary certifications for respiratory therapists. Possession of either one is a prerequisite for licensure in every state that regulates respiratory therapy. States may have different additional licensing requirements, so find out more by contacting the health board in your state.   Salary and Jobs for Respiratory Therapists As a respiratory therapist, your pay will vary based on your position, employer, level of education as well as experience. As of May 2022, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) states that the median yearly salary for respiratory therapists was $70,540.   There ought to be a lot of available jobs in this industry. According to BLS projections, employment of respiratory therapists is expected to grow by 13% between 2022 and 2032, which is significantly faster than average. Salary thus becomes a very crucial part of the discourse when asking “how to become a respiratory therapist.”  How Long Does It Take to Become a Respiratory Therapist? A common question among students considering respiratory therapy careers is how long it takes to become a respiratory therapist. For professionals pursuing an associate's degree, becoming a respiratory therapist in the US requires at least two years of training. But the time it takes you to become a respiratory therapist is up to you! If you're pursuing a bachelor's degree, then it could take up to four years to become a respiratory therapist.  The learning process does not end there. Respiratory therapists can continue their education to become more specialized in areas such as management even after they receive their accreditation. Furthermore, advanced degrees in respiratory therapy provide excellent learning opportunities in addition to professional advancement. The knowledge underlying respiratory care is always changing. This is much like many other subfields in healthcare. Obtaining more education is one way to stay "up to date" on the latest developments.   Is Nursing Easier Than Respiratory Therapy? Comparing a respiratory therapist to a nurse is like comparing apples to oranges in many aspects.    However, some contend that respiratory therapy may not be as difficult as nursing. In addition to supporting the patient's entire body, nurses offer general education. In the meantime, respiratory therapists focus exclusively on the heart and lungs. Consequently, the autonomy that comes with being a respiratory therapist may not be present in nursing.   Despite their differences, respiratory therapists and nurses face similar difficulties in their line of work. Whether they are helping those on life support or tending to patients with breathing difficulties, they are on the front lines of patient care.     In addition to the potential for infectious diseases and occasionally demanding work schedules, a career in respiratory therapy can be both fulfilling and taxing.   Wrapping Up Those who want to work on the front lines of patient care as well as change the healthcare system should consider a career as a respiratory therapist.   The path to becoming a respiratory therapist can be challenging. It will require an associate's or bachelor's degree in addition to NBRC-recognized certification. Respiratory therapy is not for the faint of heart, especially when combined with the occasionally long hours and stress of the job.    But aside from the bright prospects for employment and the attractive pay, it's tremendously fulfilling to know that your skill and attention can save a patient's life.   If you have thoughts to share or questions to ask about how to become a respiratory therapist, please leave a comment below. We would love to hear from you! If you want more career options, click here.  Learn More About: How To Become A Physician Assistant In 7 Years Or Less Step-By-Step Guide On Becoming An Esthetician In 2024 Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory In Adult Gerontology Nursing

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