Traditional Job Interviews Will Be Dead by 2020

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A majority of companies use traditional job interviews when hiring. This involves having the interviewee coming in and meeting the interviewers face-to-face. This method doesn’t work, according to Simpay, author of “10 Interview Questions To Ask To Find Your Next Retail Super Employee.”

To begin with, most people actually lie during interviews. They do it because, given the kind of environment created by traditional interviews, candidates are willing to do anything to get through.

Take candidates during an interview for a position in your company, for example. You ask them if they have a certain skill that you probably deem important to the job they are interviewing for. The candidates obviously know that if they admit to not having that skill, they will not get the job. So, they will most likely skirt around the topic and give you the impression that they are more than qualified for the job. As an employer, many of your candidates are spoon feeding you these dishonest answers and, if modern data is anything to go by, many employees are eating this misinformation up.

We Have Too Many Biases :

It’s not just about the lies that interviewees tell you during interviewers. It’s also about the inherent psychological biases you have that make you more likely to favor certain types of candidates over others.

For starters, we tend to evaluate attractive people more favorably than others. We see them as being more intelligent than their less attractive peers, more competent and more qualified. The truth, however, is that this isn’t objectively true.

We also evaluate taller people in a different way that we evaluate shorter ones. Height is associated with leadership skills, and so taller people are evaluated as having greater leadership skills. Just look at the presidents we’ve had for most of our history and a majority of the CEOs at large Fortune 500 companies. Taller people also seem to command higher salaries than their shorter counterparts.

We tend to think of people with lower-pitched voices as more trustworthy and consider them to have more integrity and fortitude.

None of the biases above are objectively true. Short people can be leaders just as great as tall people, unattractive people have often proven more intelligent and competent than their attractive counterparts and people with higher pitches can be just as trustworthy as those with lower pitches. It doesn’t help, however, because these biases are ingrained in most of us.

If you somehow arrive at the conclusion that a candidate is an introvert, you will automatically assume they are incapable of leading teams, even though that isn’t necessarily so. Our inherent assumptions affect how we even question candidates.

The Future of Job Interviews :

This is why the future will contain very few traditional interviews. Instead, we will do more job auditions, where the candidates will be required to perform tasks related to the jobs they are applying for, much like the auditions musicians attend.

You can get a sales representative to sell you a product or a software engineer to build you a simple product. These will prove much more effective going forward, especially for jobs where performance and hard skills matter the most.

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