Seeking a Healthy Career: 10 Tempting Medical Careers to Check Out

Published on: 21 November 2018 Last Updated on: 19 July 2019
Medical Careers

Are you looking for a stable, rewarding career that allows you to help others, while still making good money?

If so, then a career in the medical field may be right for you!

Many people scoff at the idea of switching to a career in medicine. This is because when many people think “medical career” they think “doctor”.

And that, of course, leads to people to think that the only way to make it in the medical field is to give up ten plus years of your life for school while going hundreds of thousands of dollars into debt.

However, there are a lot of careers that you can do in the medical field that don’t require years and years of schooling and money. And, people often get just as much job satisfaction from these careers as doctors do.

What careers are we talking about, exactly?

Read on to learn about the top 10 medical careers to check out for those looking for a career switch.

1. Ultrasound Technician:

Working as an ultrasound technician is perhaps one of the least stressful medical careers out there.

And, it’s super fulfilling. Even better, it pays well and does not take that much schooling.

As an ultrasound technician, you get to witness one of the most joyous moments in a person’s life- seeing their baby for the first time!

However, your job will consist of a lot more than just showing future parents their babies on an ultrasound machine.

Your job will also consist of using the ultrasound machine to identify blood clots, diagnose tumors, evaluate heart conditions, and more.

For an entry-level job, you will need an associates degree, a diploma or a certificate. Job growth in this field is at a healthy 17 percent, and you can expect to make around $70,000.

2. Biomedical Engineer:

Are you looking for a career in the medical field that is less patient focused?

If so, a career as a biomedical engineer may be for you.

As a biomedical engineer, you’ll get to use your skills in science and math to further the medical field.

You will be in constant contact with other scientists, doctors, and nurses to repair and improve upon various medical devices. You may even get the chance to help develop an artificial organ.

Some other biomedical engineers work to develop software for medical devices, research emerging technologies, or design new devices.

In this career, you may find yourself working in a lab, hospital, or university, or government agency.

You will need a bachelor’s degree in engineering in order to enter this career field. However, if you are going back to school, you may not need to redo your generals. Therefore, you could knock off a year or two of schooling.

As a biomedical engineer, you can expect to make close to six figures.

3. Phlebotomist:

We’ve all had our blood drawn at a doctor’s appointment or for a blood drive.

The person drawing your blood in these situations is a phlebotomist.

A lot of people think phlebotomists only draw blood. However, they do a lot more than that. However, due to the fact that many people are afraid of needles, your job will also involve putting your people skills to the test.

Calming down and soothing patients will be a regular part of your job.

If you work blood drives, you’ll also be responsible for screening patients to ensure they’re fit to give blood.

You can also work towards other applicable certificates as a phlebotomist, such as a bloodborne pathogens certificate. You can find more info about that here.

Training to become a phlebotomist takes as little as 8 months. And, school is often a couple of nights a week.

Therefore, this is a career that you can easily transition to while still keeping your old job.

4. Medical Illustrator:

A medical illustrator is a career that very few people know about.

This is a shame, as this job can be super exciting and fascinating.

If you’re someone who is equally right-brained and left-brained oriented, this career may be for you.

Medical illustrators work to create graphic representations and drawings of different parts of the body. Their “artwork” can be used for a variety of purposes, including legal proceedings, posters, and textbooks.

You will use extremely precise graphic design software to create these images. The images you create will help educate students, patients, doctors, and nurses.

You will need to get a Masters in Medical Illustration in order to enter this field. But, those two years will quickly pay off, as you can expect to make close to six figures.

5. Radiologic Technologist:

Physicians and medical professionals rely on imaging technology to diagnose and treat patients.

The images they use don’t just appear out of the blue. They are created with the help of a radiologic technologist, also commonly known as an x-ray technician.

In this role, you will use imaging technology to create highly-sophisticated images of patients’ body parts. Once you’ve created the images, you will be responsible for updating the patient’s file accordingly.

This is another great career field that offers great pay and low stress.

The average salary for this position is around $60,000. You will need an associate’s degree to qualify for work.

6. Nutritionist:

The US is one of the most obese countries in the world, which means we could use more nutritionists to get us on healthier diets.

As a nutritionist, you will get the opportunity to educate patients about what it takes to lead a healthy lifestyle.

In this role, you will design a nutrition program for your clients to follow in order to meet their lifestyle goals.

You could work with a patient with Type II diabetes, creating a diet plan for them that will help them lose weight. Or, maybe you’ll work with someone who has Celiac’s disease to create a healthy and diverse diet plan that won’t make them sick.

This is another medical career that is extremely low-stress. And, you only need a bachelor’s degree to do it.

Are You Ready for One of These Medical Careers?

As you can see, there are a lot of medical careers out there that have nothing to do with being a doctor.

Now, all you need to do is choose one that you’d like to pursue.

However, before you make the leap, be sure to check out this article about the top things you should know before entering a medical career.

Read Also:

I enjoy writing and I write quality guest posts on topics of my interest and passion. I have been doing this since my college days. My special interests are in health, fitness, food and following the latest trends in these areas. I am an editor at Content Rally.

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Is Health Care A Good Career Path

Is Health Care A Good Career Path?

Is Health Care A Good Career Path? As you are searching about this question, I believe you are thinking about starting your career. It is always best to explore the available options. It is also crucial to make a decision beforehand so that you can prepare yourself both academically and characteristically.  After all, you need to have a particular degree along with other expertise and skills in order to get a job. Especially when you are targeting a particular industry.  For example, as you are searching about whether the healthcare industry is a suitable career path or not, you can be ready for that.  Here, in this article, along with providing you with the answer to your question, I will also guide you with some related information that you must know when you are thinking about these career options.  What Is A Health Care Career?  This is indeed a broad term which covers a wide range of occupations, specifically in the medical field. From nurses to doctors to pharmacists to therapies, you will find different types of healthcare careers that are available for you.  All you need to do is pick up the most suitable one for yourself. Although each profession has its unique set of responsibilities, they hold the single goal of improving the well-being and health of patients.  Read More: Ensuring Quality Healthcare with Correct Diagnoses Requirements Image Source As I have already mentioned, there are several types of healthcare jobs available. Some of the job profiles need a high school diploma; on the other hand, some require a doctorate degree along with many years of medical training.  Here, I have curated a list of the professions as per the minimum education level.  Educational DegreeAvailable JobsGED or high school diplomaOpticians. Pharmacy technicians. Veterinary assistants and also laboratory animal caretakers. Personal care and home health aides. Post-secondary non-degreesSurgical technicians.Licensed practical and also licensed vocational nurses. Massage therapist. Dental assistants. Phlebotomists. Medical assistants. Paramedics and ENTs.  Medical transcriptionists. Health information and medical records specialists. Associate degreeRadiation therapists. Nuclear medicine technologists. Dental hygienists. Registered nurses. Medical cardiovascular technologists and technicians, and sonographers. MRI technologists and radiologists. Respiratory therapists. Veterinary technologists and technicians.  Bachelor’s degreeRegistered nurses. Nutritionist and dietician. Clinical laboratory technologists and technicians. Athletic trainers. ‘Recreational therapists. Exercise physiologists. Master’s degreeNurse midwives, nurse anesthetists, and nurse practitioners. Physician assistants. Occupational therapists. Genetic counselors. Speech-language pathologists. Prosthetics and orthotics. Doctorate and other professional degreesDentists. Podiatrists. Pharmacists. Optometrists. Veterans. Physical therapists. Audiologists. Chiropractors.  Is Health Care A Good Career Path? Now, you got a basic understanding of what a healthcare job actually is and also the requirements. It is time to answer your questions. “Is health care a good career path?” Honestly, the COVID-19 pandemic has changed a lot of things. Those things are not only our lifestyle but also the way different types of industries function. Just like many other industries, and health care industry is also affected by the effects of the global pandemic.  Healthcare professionals are the ones who have worked day and night just to ensure that the patients can recover soon and fewer people get affected by this super infectious disease.  While the doctors and nurses were doing overtime, other healthcare professionals were also given the necessary support. From laboratory technicians and other professionals.  So, standing in 2022, we definitely can say that health care is not only a good career path but also an important one. 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Bad Boss

9 Signs You Work For A Bad Boss

At one point or another, we have all complained about our bosses. It seems to go with the territory, the usual water cooler chit-chat. But there's a difference between getting upset over the overtime your boss made you work to actually working for a bad boss. How can you tell the difference? Is there a way to know if you're just being picky or if your boss is crossing the line? The answer is yes. There are several things you can watch out for to determine if you are indeed working for a bad boss. Let's discuss 9 signs to be on the lookout for, to help you learn more about the behavior you shouldn't have to put up within the workplace. 1. They Don't Motivate You : A good boss is a leader that loves to motivate their team. To see everyone succeed and enjoy what they do. And they'll show this by continually being there to give you feedback, support you, and motivate you to do your job well. If this doesn't sound like your boss, you and your team may have a problem. 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To be able to thoroughly listen to other ideas and be open-minded to other possibilities and ways of doing things. And you want them to foster open communication throughout the workplace, instead of having people be scared of being honest. 6. The Rule by Fear : If you've ever seen the movie The Devil Wears Prada, you're familiar with the mass panic that breaks out when the boss walks into the office. Everyone runs to hide or cleans up before they get yelled at, or are afraid to even be in the same elevator with her. No one should have to work in that kind of environment. That's a dictator, not a boss. And it makes for a toxic workplace. That's a situation you need to run from. Immediately. 7. They Don't Communicate Clearly : Having a boss who doesn't communicate clearly can make for a very frustrating work environment! You'll think you're on the right path in a project, then be told by your boss that he actually wanted it done another way. Or they are so vague with instructions or feedback, you're not sure what you just listened to. A good boss will effectively lead their team down a clear path with clear goals. A bad boss will leave everyone floundering around in the dark. 8. They Always Seem to Disappear : Does your boss seem to disappear for hours at a time, without telling anyone where they're going? When you need them, are you able to get ahold of them no matter where they might be? While at first, it may seem like a fun idea to have a boss that's always gone, in reality, it can cause a lot of issues in the workplace. When something comes up that needs immediate attention and it's a situation that only your boss can handle, you need to be able to count on them to be there for your team. 9. Your Gut Instinct Tells You So : That little voice inside your head is there for a reason. If it keeps warning you that something isn't right, you may want to pay attention. Don't ignore that sense of dread you have every time you go into the office. Don't brush off the feeling that something is off. If you feel like you're working for a bad boss, you likely are... and it's time to get out. Life Is Too Short To Work for a Bad Boss : If any of these warning signs apply to your work situation, it may be time to look for a new job. You spend a majority of your time working, so don't waste another minute of it working for a bad boss. You deserve better than that. Ready to kick that job search into high gear? Be sure to read our tips on how to get your resume noticed! Read Also : Go For A Better Legal Job In 2018! Ten Interview Tips That Might Surprise You: The Medical Edition The Significance Of Face-To-Face Networking For Freelancers  

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How Long Does It Take To Become An Orthodontist?

What You Need To Know Before You Decide To Become An Orthodontist?

In actuality, orthodontists undergo specialized training that qualifies them as specialists in tooth straightening. They must complete two to three additional years of coursework. Then, they can become an orthodontist and obtain a certification in orthodontic care. Orthodontists treat a wide range of dental alignment problems, commonly referred to as "malocclusion." This comes after receiving their license and certification. For patients of all ages, they employ precise clinical techniques to align teeth safely and effectively and create healthier dental structures. If you've ever received orthodontic treatment, you've probably seen the amazing outcomes these skilled medical practitioners help you achieve. Even though becoming an orthodontist is a difficult, competitive, and costly career path, orthodontists benefit from high pay, excellent work-life balance, and a welcoming, social, teamwork-based environment. Are you interested in this field? Do you want to know how long does it take to become an orthodontist? Keep reading to learn how to work in this area of medicine. How Long Does It Take To Become An Orthodontist? The study that goes into orthodontics is pretty massive, and it remains a lifelong process. Orthodontists take up a subject that costs an incredible sum but pays too well in the long run. If you are curious as to how long it takes to become an orthodontist, you are not alone. Education And Training Requirements In order to become an orthodontist, there are levels that need to be crossed. Here, we are discussing it in detail. This should give you an idea of how long it take to become an orthodontist. Finish Dental School To Become Licensed In order to become an orthodontist, one must first earn a doctorate in dentistry and obtain certification as a dentist. You must complete a bachelor's degree (though some colleges offer a combined degree program) in order to get admission to a dental school. You will also need a passing score on the Dental Admission Test (DAT). Like medical schools, dental schools are extremely demanding and competitive. Additionally, they are expensive. Depending on the program, a dental school degree can cost anywhere from $150,000 to $300,000. Fortunately, the majority of dental professionals discover that the expense of school eventually pays off because dentist as well as orthodontist have high salaries. According to the U.S. News, dentists make a median salary of $151,850, while an orthodontist's salary is $208,000. A doctor of dental surgery (DDS) or a doctor of dental medicine (DMD) are the two categories of doctorates. Depending on your program, the distinction may exist, but you can practice dentistry with either certification. Dental schools typically offer four-year degrees. Typically, the first two years go by in a classroom, studying topics like oral pathology, anatomy, biochemistry, microbiology, and radiology. Students will study under a licensed dentist for the next two years in order to gain experience treating patients in a clinical setting. Orthodontic Residency In their final year of dental school, prospective orthodontists apply to orthodontic residencies; upon earning their DDS or DMD, they will become certified dentists and be eligible to start an orthodontic residency. In addition to taking and passing the National Board Dental Examination, dentists who choose not to pursue further education must also fulfill their state's licensing requirements before they can start practicing. Although dentists are still capable of providing orthodontic treatment, they lack training in this area specifically. As a result, the majority of dentists working today are registered orthodontists who have finished a residency. The term "orthodontist" is exclusive to those dentists. An orthodontic residency is your next step when becoming a licensed orthodontist for those who want to work as full-time practitioners of orthodontics. It is often attached to a university. How To Get Into An Orthodontic Residency Program? It's tough to get into an orthodontic residency. Only one spot is available for every fifteen applicants, according to the American Association of Orthodontists. The best method to secure a spot in an orthodontic residency is to graduate in the top percentage of your dental school class. A prospective orthodontist may submit multiple applications before being admitted to a program. The National Board Dental Examination is the national licensing exam that dentists must pass in order to be eligible to apply to most residency programs. Unless you failed the exam and had to retake it before applying to schools, you won't need to take a break between dental school and your orthodontic residency because this exam is valid during dental school. The American Association of Orthodontists' database has a list of orthodontic residencies that have received CODA accreditation. Both the United States and Canada offer the programs on this list. Most states accept orthodontic training from Canada. However, individuals who have received orthodontic training abroad will probably need to retake their studies in the United States. That, if they want to practice dentistry or orthodontics there. Residency programs range from 3-5 years, depending on the organization. Orthodontists receive extensive training in both the art and science of orthodontia during their residency. They learn about the proper alignment of dental, jaw, and facial mold, as well as how to move teeth in a safe and effective manner. How many years does it take to become an orthodontist, you ask? Their time learning the science is much shorter than their time in practice. Orthodontists who complete a residency program will have treated hundreds of patients, providing them with extensive knowledge in this field. Salary Of Orthodontics While some orthodontic residencies don't charge their residents, others do. If they do have compensation, it usually takes the shape of a stipend, which is a modest yearly sum used to pay for conference travel or some other necessities. Compared to university residencies, hospital residencies are more likely to provide a stipend. Due to its exceptional location and exceptionally high stipend (first-year residents earn over $51,000), this program is highly competitive. For example, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York.. This program provides top-notch training along with a $60,000 stipend for the duration of the residency.  Getting The License You will be qualified to begin orthodontic practice after completing an orthodontic residency successfully. In order to accomplish this, you need to have fulfilled both the state licensing requirements in the state in which you plan to practice dentistry and the national dental board exam. Like dentists, orthodontists must meet the same licensing requirements. Orthodontists have the option of earning board certification from the American Board of Orthodontics (ABO), though practice in the United States does not require board certification (only in Canada does). Written and clinical exams are required for orthodontic board certification. Visit the American Board of Orthodontics website to find out more about obtaining board certification. Before starting their residency, the majority of orthodontists had already passed the National Board Dental Examination. Throughout their careers, all practicing medical professionals are required to recertify and complete continuing education requirements. States have different requirements for licensing, but most of them ask you to pass a "jurisprudence exam," which measures your familiarity with the dental laws of that state. The state-by-state licensures database maintained by the American Dental Association provides information on dental licensing requirements in each state. Additional clinical exams or requirements may apply. Staying Licensed Just like all other medical professionals, orthodontists must maintain current licensures through regular recertification and continuing education. Dentists and orthodontists are required by law to complete 40 hours of professional education annually in most states. In order to give their patients the best possible care, dental professionals are kept up to date on the most recent clinical and research advancements in their fields. The requirements for renewing a dental license vary by state; for more information on how to maintain your license current, contact the dental board in your state. Wrapping Up So, how long does it take to become an orthodontist? Residency programs vary in length, from three years to five years. Throughout their residency, orthodontists learn from experts in the field to ensure safe and efficient advancement. It provides them with a thorough understanding of this specialty. This entails staying updated about conducting clinical examinations, obtaining and analyzing diagnostic records, providing appropriate direction for dentofacial orthopedics, etc. Key traits that an orthodontist should have include patience, effective written and verbal communication, and the capacity to clarify difficult ideas. These come in handy when dealing with children and teenagers, who make up the bulk of orthodontic patients. You need to apply for and obtain a separate orthodontics license from your national registering body or dental board in addition to your dentist license. It might call for passing a test. After earning your orthodontics degree and license, you can easily find employment or open your own practice!If you have thoughts to share or questions to ask about how long does it take to become an orthodontist, ask us below. We would love to hear from you! Learn More About: Why Going To The Dentist Is A Must? The Ultimate Guide To Finding The Best Dentist In Vaughan Radiant Smiles: A Guide To Different Types Of Dental Implants

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