5 Tips to Keeping Animals Away From Your Garden

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11 September 2018

Home & Garden

Animals might be cute, furry, and very pleasing to look at but they can seriously be destructive to your field, some of us may enjoy their company, others might want to kill them instantly! Either way, if you do not take care of who enters your garden, your plants may not thank you. Check out the rest of the article to understand what kind of animals can spoil your garden and how to restrict their movement.

Who are these animals?

are these animals

Some of the most common garden animals include chipmunks, squirrels, skunks, mice, moles, rats, and opossums. To learn more about possums, click get rid of possum. These animals dig holes into the ground, eat your fruits and vegetables, multiply or lay eggs in your garden, and generally wreak havoc. Other larger animals include dogs, deer, birds, snakes, etc. Just having them run around the garden can cause large-scale destruction.

Ways to get rid of animals in your garden

There are several ways to control the entry of animals in your garden. Some are more effective than others. To learn more about these methods, read on.

1. Identify the creature :

Identify the creature

The best way to control animals is to identify them first. This way you would know exactly how to deal with them by understanding their behavior and ways of living or multiplying. You can then target the animal with exactly the right technique that is needed to get rid of them. It is necessary to identify the animal to learn about its habitat, control them, and devise an effective solution.

2. Make your garden animal proof :

garden animal proof

By making your garden attractive to animals, you will invite more pests into it. Therefore, certain methods need to be adopted to make sure that the animals stay away. One such method is to cut down on places that can house such animals, like tall grass, bushes, or a pile of leaves. Some animals can even crawl under your deck or porch.

Minimize any food sources, like birdbaths and seed booths, where animals like squirrels may come to feed. Moreover, you should cover your compost pile that attracts raccoons and fruit and vegetable patches with nets to avoid dogs, cats, deer, etc.

3. Fences, nets, and traps :

Fences, nets, and traps

Fences are a great option to help minimize the entry of animals. For smaller animals, like rats, squirrels, rabbits, and more, small fences around your garden are enough. But for larger animals, like dogs and deer, larger and taller fences are required. Putting up taller fences can go a little heavy on your pocket, so securing plants is probably a better option.

Nets are a great way to prevent animals from actually feeding on your produce, like fruits and vegetables. Just adding a mesh or net around your patches can make a huge difference. Traps can be placed throughout the garden to catch animals with the help of baits. Use some food, like cheese, crackers, or biscuits, to lure animals into the trap, which then slams shut. Animals are also not harmed this way. It’s easy to catch possums, rats, squirrels, etc. with the help of traps.

4. Repellents :

Repellents

Some animals can be repelled using auditory techniques, like certain sounds, and repellents that smell a certain way, thus driving or scaring away the animal out of your garden. Some examples of repellents are – predatory urine, garlic clips, and castor oil. But these repellants need to be applied and monitored on a regular basis to make sure they are effective. Some of these repellents, however, can be toxic to humans, so be careful, which repellents you choose.

Auditory repellents include motion-sensitive water sprayers, ultrasonic repellers, and visual scare devices, such as reflective tape. The only problem with these repellents is that pests may become immune to these methods, and therefore they may decrease in effectiveness over time. Make sure you read all the directions given on any repellants or products before using them.

5. Do on the spot management :

For example, when moles create boroughs in your garden, you can place mothballs in the holes to repel them. Moles don’t eat your garden produce but their tunnels can cause your plants to die since plants may not find space to grow underneath the ground with enough nutrients.

If certain animals have entered your garden, immediately introduce the predator species into your gardens, such as cats and dogs, to scare away the pests. Cats and dogs prey on animals, like mice and rats. In some cases, you can hand aluminum foils with strings in your garden. The shiny material can scare away the animals. Again, the effectiveness of this method may die with time.

Pests are destructive to your garden and should definitely be identified and eradicated. However, there’s no need to kill these animals in order to get rid of them. You can also use humane ways to get animals out of your garden. Use the methods given above in order to get rid of animals, including possums, from your garden. This will help you get a more secure and flourishing garden in no time!

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I enjoy writing and I write quality guest posts on topics of my interest and passion. I have been doing this since my college days. My special interests are in health, fitness, food and following the latest trends in these areas. I am an editor at Content Rally.

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